Curation

As an enthusiastic collaborator and art lover I have initiated and collaborated on numerous curation projects throughout my career, from exhibitions and festivals to murals and installations. Here are a selection I’ve been proud to contribute to:

The Art of Action included original artworks on paper by 24+ artists from:
Tano Veron, Gerdy Harapos, Nazza, Tester, Marian Calle, Fede (Run Don’t Walk), Cabaio, Malatesta, bs.as.stencil, BA Paste Up, Erre, Toxicómano, Lesivo, djlu, Stinkfish, Emptyboy, Diseqtiva, Hogre, Voxx Romana, Skam, RX Skulls, Mais±Menos, Hugo Kaagman

2020 – The Art of Action

An exhibition of worldwide poster art held at That Art Gallery, Bristol

Featured artwork from USA, Colombia, The Netherlands, Portugal, Italy, Mexico, Argentina, & Brazil. The idea of the show was to bring the The Stencil Graffiti Handbook book to life and give people a taste of the innovative street artworks being created across the globe.

Activist artists that I helped to invite to the Geodome included, Tammam Azzam (Syria), Ammar Abd Rabbo (Syria), Foundland (Syria/South Africa), Mana Neyestani (Iran), Huda Beydoun, (Saudi Arabia), Munir Sayegh (Egypt), JoAnna Pollonais (Canada), Beshoy Fayez (Egypt), Fares Cachoux (Syria), El Teneen (Egypt), Ganzeer (Egypt), Virginie Nguyen Hoang (Egypt) – Not forgetting meeting Jack Black on the opening night!

2015 – Dismaland 

For Dismaland my role was as a co-curator. In the first instance, I was tasked with suggesting suitable artists for general inclusion at the ‘Bemusement park’. Some of the artists that I suggested were subsequently invited to take part such as, Ben Long, Joe Fig, Wasted Rita, Scott Hove and Axel Void. Following this I helped with some of the production that was needed.

In the 2nd instance, my main task was in artist research, coordination, and production for the activists Geodome, which featured activist artworks from around the world – including banners, posters, placards, and photographs. We were particularly keen to show artworks from the Arabic world.

Among the artists invited: Blek, StenLex, Sadhu, C215, Lucamaleonte,  Orticanoodles, Hugo Kaagman, Dolk, Pobel, M-City, Vhils, Btoy, Sam3, Faile, Eine, John Grider, Logan Hicks, Pure Evil, Dotmasters, Dan, Eelus, Bsas Stencil, Run Don’t Walk, James Dodd, Tom Civil , Vexta, Prism, Daniel Melim, Altocontraste, Bandit, Roadsworth, 3D Del Naja, Artiste-Ouvrier, Hutch, Hogre, Snub and others!

2008 – Cans Festival, Leake St, London

A career highlight – I was honoured to be given a curatorial role of behalf of POW to invite artists from around the world who I thought to be producing the best in Stencil Art.

With nearly 30,000 visitors over three days  the public and artists thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Perhaps most gratifying was the level of interactivity, with 651 artists from the public registering to paint their own stencils during the event. The main attraction unquestionably was Banksy, with four new large-scale murals, sculptures and anarchic installations, his work brought in a diverse crowd that art galleries can only dream of attracting.

Not to be overshadowed, around 50 artists invited from 15 countries also made their mark with a diverse range of styles and subjects. From the well-regarded stencil graffiti hubs of Buenos Aires and Melbourne to the lesser-known hotspots such as Lisbon and Bergen, the cream of the stencil art world was in attendance.

International artists included: Swoon, Ron English, Blu, Ericailcane, Sam3, Faile, Paul Insect, Bäst, Banksy & Kennard/Phillips.

2007 – Santa’s Ghetto – Bethlehem

It was a humbling experience to have been able to assist at Santa’s Ghetto – my role was artist liaison – inviting artists and helping them with what they needed to create works while they were there, as well as helping man the art space.

Each December for six years running, East London screenprint publishers Pictures on Walls had hosted a “squat art concept store” known as Santa’s Ghetto. Usually the venue is an empty shop space, transformed  into a wonderland of underground art. This year was different swapping London for Bethlehem’s Manger Square as the venue.

At the time Bethlehem was described in a National Geographic article as “one of the most contentious places on Earth”. – which today still hold’s true. Positioned in the West Bank, on land taken by Israel during the Six Day War of 1967, it’s a Palestinian city that today is surrounded by a separation barrier, an eight-metre-high wall built by the Israeli military.

Santa’s Ghetto invited close to 20 artists to take part in the project during the month with the idea that more art would get made for sale and draw attention to the event. While the show was an important element of the project, it was the art on walls that became the most visible statement and got the media attention.

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